Fall Edible Gardening Tips

Fall Edible Gardening Tips

Fall is a great time to:

  • Install a new edible raised bed in good weather without a rush

  • Plant a fall crop of veggies

  • Super-charge an edible bed with composted manure for a spring harvest.

Get free garden coaching

When you buy a raised bed, soil, mulch, fertilizer, seedlings or other products and services from Deep Roots get free coaching for your fall gardening from the Deep Roots director David Murphy. Contact David at (773) 502-5600 and dmurphy[at]deep-roots-project.org

Filling space vacated by spring crops with summer-sown vegetables will keep your garden productive well into fall, and even winter. Beans, cucumbers, eggplant, musk melon, okra, peppers, pumpkins, squash, sweet corn, sweet potato, and tomatoes will all be damaged by even a light frost, but many other crops will survive. Fall, with its cooler temperatures and more abundant moisture, offers excellent growing conditions for many vegetables. As summer draws to a close, gardens everywhere can morph into a tapestry of delicious greens like tender lettuce, frost-proof spinach, swiss chard, collards, arugula, beets, kale with a sprinkling of red mustard added for spice. Plus, cooler temperatures will make your fall vegetables taste crisp and sweet. Learn more about frost-tolerant garden vegetables.

Healthy Living

Healthy Living

Deep Roots Project invites you to watch the important new video docu-series, "GMOs Revealed” using our login credentials for streaming video. Learn about the latest startling scientific information and the little discussed politics behind the GMO industry. 

Greening the community, one edible garden at a time

Deep Roots Project aims to change the way people eat

Tuesday, July 24th, 2018 11:58 AM

Original post: http://www.oakpark.com/News/Articles/7-24-2018/Greening-the-community,-one-edible-garden-at-a-time/

By Lacey Sikora
Contributing Reporter

In March, the Deep Roots Project was awarded a Big Idea Grant of $17,000 by the Entrepreneur Leaders in Philanthropy Fund, a giving group of the Oak Park-River Forest Community Foundation. 

The award will fund Deep Roots' Lawns to Garden initiative, and as part of that initiative, Deep Roots is holding a contest that runs through Nov. 1 to give away 10 edible gardens, along with two years of maintenance, free workshops and a gardening coach.

Community supports Deep Roots Project at Trailside Ribbon-Cutting Event

Community comes together at ribbon-cutting program to provide Inspiration for more than just food!

When the Deep Roots Project cut the ribbon on their first Inspiration Edible Garden Bed awarded to the Trailside museum on Sunday 7/29/18, the program was more than just about growing food, it was about connecting communities and working together to make a culture shift.

With lovely weather and a reason to celebrate, over 50 people gathered in the beautiful Nature and Play area at Trailside Museum to hear about local opportunities, eat delicious fruits and vegetables, sing and celebrate the sustainable idea of growing edible plants on your front lawn instead of grass!

How to Create a Head-Turning Yard... Even if You're Always Busy

How to Create a Head-Turning Yard... Even if You're Always Busy

Have you ever driven by a home with an incredible looking lawn and thought, “Who has the time to make their yard look like that?” We all know what it’s like to dream of the perfect lawn, to make plans for giving it the attention it needs, and to have life happen and change those plans. The good news is that there are practical solutions that can help you create a head-turning yard this summer, and you can do them even with a busy schedule.

Don’t Over-Mow

An overgrown lawn is a quick way to make your property appear abandoned, so it’s important to keep it in shape. But you also want to avoid over-mowing it. It’s better to plan your mowing around how your grass is growing rather than worry about sticking to a strict schedule. In other words, the length of the grass matters more than how often you mow. Depending on your geographical location and how much rain you’re getting, this can change by the week. Sometimes you may need to mow weekly and sometimes it may be every two weeks.

When you over-mow, it keeps your grass from properly growing and reaching its lush, green potential. A good indicator that your grass isn’t growing is if it pales or turns yellow. If you see that, you should let it grow a little before you cut it again. Also, it’s common lawn advice to never cut more than one-third off the length of your blades. Even if it’s severely overgrown, it’s better to first cut one-third off your grass and to gradually make it lower.

Bayer Has Just Purchased Monsanto

Bayer Has Just Purchased Monsanto

Bayer has just purchased Monsanto for 62.5 billion dollars, cementing one of the most unholy business marriages of all time. The two companies are equally yoked with a history of evil and self-serving business practices are concerned, and it’s important for the public to know what this massive business merger means.

The Bride

Monsanto is the company that is responsible for creating and marketing products like genetically modified BT corn (corn plants with built-in pesticide genes spliced into their DNA) and “Round-up ready” GMOs—plants that are engineered to resist the herbicide Roundup so that fields can be saturated with chemicals that kill weeds, but not the modified crops. Rather than increase crop yields as promised, GMOs have increased the use of herbicides and caused an alarming outbreak of herbicide-resistant “superweeds”.

Eco-Friendly Ways to Make Your Yard Look Fabulous

Eco-Friendly Ways to Make Your Yard Look Fabulous

They say the grass is greener on the other side, but we’re not sure which side they are starting from. It doesn’t matter where you live, there are ways you can “go green” in the yard, and many of them have nothing to do with the color of your grass. Keep reading for five water-saving, eco-friendly, and easy lawn and garden changes you can make this summer.

Get Rid of the Grass

Grass needs water -- and lots of it. It’s everywhere, and when it gets too dry, it makes your landscape look like a barren plain. You can buck the tradition of having regular grass by swapping your fescue for fragrant ground coverings such as creeping thyme or Roman chamomile. Moss is another option for shaded areas. If you’re handy with a shovel, you can also level out a section of your lawn to create a hardscape design with pavers, rocks, statues, and potted plants. Reader’s Digest also suggests laying down some mulch and creating a play area for the kids.